Lesson 55- Happy Mourners

Lesson 55- Happy Mourners

February 22, 2015
Audio Commentary by David Daniel- Life Focus Leader


Lesson 55
 
Happy Mourners?
 
Scripture: Matthew 5:4
 
Lesson Goal: To learn and understand the truth of being “blessed”
by God’s comfort in mourning. How can mourning bring happiness?
 
Charles H. Spurgeon, a Protestant preacher of the nineteenth century, states, “The way to rise in the kingdom is to sink in ourselves.”
 
Today we look at the second of the beatitudes, as given by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount.
 
(V4) “Blessed are those who mourn, For they shall be comforted.”
At first reading, this verse seems like a startling paradox (contradiction) in what it states. The word “blessed” means happy, highly content, a
state of joy and well-being that does not depend on physical, temporary circumstances. Happy (blessed), are those that mourn. Jesus states simply that those who mourn are blessed.
 
As I write today’s lesson, I literally pause to pray for each of you who will be reading and studying the words I write: “God grant us wisdom
and understanding of Your Word.”
 
As we studied last week, entrance into the kingdom of heaven begins
with the recognition of our total dependency on God. The only way we can gain entrance into the kingdom is empty-handed; it is only by God’s grace and not by anything we bring to Him. It is not by our works,
accomplishments, merits, or achievements we come to Him.
 
 Please explain what it means that we all come to Jesus empty-handed.
 
 
Knowing that it is the “poor in spirit” who enter the kingdom of heaven, we should always sense and remember the truth of Romans 7:18.
The truth of verse 3 brings us to the truth of verse 4. “Spiritual poverty leads to godly sorrow; the poor in spirit become those who mourn”
(MacArthur).
 
In the New Testament, there are nine different Greek words that speak of sorrow and of its commonness in all our lives. Of these nine words, the one used in verse 4 (Greek pentheō) is the strongest and represents the strongest, deepest, most gut-wrenching, heart-breaking kind of mourning that we can experience. This word is usually reserved to describe the kind of grief and sorrow related to the loss of a loved one in death. It was used to describe the disciples mourning for Jesus before He had been raised from the dead. See Mark 16:10.
 
• In your own words, describe this kind of sorrow or mourning.
 
 
This word carries the idea of a deep inward agony that may or may not be expressed outwardly by weeping, lamenting and anguish. In Mark 16:10, what words follow the word mourned?
 
The mourning Jesus speaks of in verse four refers to the reality of when a person recognizes the weight of sin and the spiritual bankruptcy of self. The recognition of the genuineness of our spiritual condition produces genuineness in our response, which then brings about true mourning.
This mourning has nothing to do with feeling bad over some unhappy event in our lives. This refers to the condition of the human heart. Only when we are truly sorrowful for our spiritual bankruptcy can the grace
of God be introduced. It is through God’s grace that we experience the happiness of His comfort and forgiveness.
 
Some very tough questions—
 How long has it been since you mourned over the lostness of a friend, family member, co-worker, teammate, or neighbor?
 
 
• How long has it been since you genuinely mourned over someone’s rejection of Jesus Christ? We must remember that to not know Jesus Christ as personal savior is to reject Him.
 
 
• How can Matthew Ministry be an avenue to minister to those without Jesus?
 
 
• During the past eight weeks, what did you do, outside your normal activities of life, to show someone the love of Jesus?
 
 
• Can we ever become so satisfied with our own salvation that we forget what it was like to be without Jesus?
 
 
• If someone dies without Jesus, what happens to that person?
 
 
The reality is that we sometimes forget the meaning and ultimate result
of a person being lost. Jesus’ words are a reminder that for the lost who have been found (us—those who know Jesus), there should be a deep sense of awareness of those who still do not know Jesus Christ as their personal Savior. This understanding should bring true believers to a place of earnest mourning for those who are on the road to eternal separation without from Christ.
 
An even tougher question to ask yourself:
• In my life, who have I forgotten how to mourn for?
 
 
• For whom has my heart grown calloused and cold?
 
 
• Have I accepted someone as lost (family, friend, co-worker, classmate)? And have I just kept going on with my life anyway?
 
 
• Please answer earnestly and honestly. Is it sometimes just easier to forget or ignore the lost than to think of them, let alone, mourn for them?
 
 
• What would happen if the true believers at Mars Hill Baptist Church learned to mourn again for the lost?
 
 
Jesus gives us the answer to the above question: “Blessed are those that mourn, For they shall be comforted.”
 
Let me remind us all that it is not only the lostness of others that should lead us to mourning, but sin in the life of a believer should cause us to mourn.
 
How long has it been since you wept over your own sin?
We (true believers) should never abuse the manifold graces of God.
Please read Romans 6:1-2.
 
Those who truly mourn their own sins will be comforted by the
forgiveness of God. Blessed, happy, is he who is forgiven!!!
 
I walked a mile with Pleasure
She chatted all the way
But left me none the wiser
For all she had to say.

I walked a mile with Sorrow
And ne’er a word said she
But, oh! The things I learned from her
When Sorrow walked with me (Hamilton).